Monitor Verizon Wireless minutes usage in Firefox

If you are a Verizon Wireless customer and use Firefox, check out the Verizon Minutes Used Firefox Extension.

Link: http://verizon-minutes-used.blogspot.com

I was looking for a Google start page widget to monitor my Verizon Wireless minutes usage but stumbled upon this Firefox add-on.

This Firefox addon works great! I have it configured to 0nly display the peak minute usage in the status bar. It has a nice pop up tool tip screen with all the details I would ever need about my account. You can double click the add-on to sign into the Verizon Wireless web site too.

Verizon Wireless, you should be paying this guy for this plug-in. It is these convenience features that will keep me a Verizon Wireless Customer.

Verizon billing department on crack!

I just listened to the post on the Geek News Central about how Verizon quoted a Internet Access rate of .002 cents a kilobyte and charged .002 dollars per kilobyte. The customer in question used 71,000 kilobytes of bandwidth. This sounds like a lot but once you translate it to megabyte, we are talking about 70 megabytes. This is the equivalent to downloading 2-3 podcasts, which could easily be done in the matter of a few minutes on a normal Internet connection. With the amount of downloading I do, I would expect a rate of .002 cents per kilobyte, since I could easily go through a Gigabyte of data a month. So, think about this…

1 Gigabyte of data through Verizon at the .002 cents rate, would be $20, reasonable monthly fee

1 Gigabyte of data through Verizon at .002 dollars rate, would be $2000, this is completely unreasonable.

1 Gigabyte of data in a month could easily be used simply by downloading Windows updates, reading E-mail, download and install a large application such as OpenOffice, downloading podcasts, viewing some pictures on flickr, watch a video on YouTube about how Verizon does not understand math and you got your Gigabyte used up.

Read more: http://www.geeknewscentral.com/archives/006671.html

You want some Java, well we have many flavors…

Many years ago I downloaded Java, a program used mainly for web browsers. Well A few weeks ago I again had a need to download Java and almost immediately my leg started to shake. See, every time I go to the sun.com web site, I find my computer expertise does not help me in any way to find what I need.

I am aware that most people who use Java most likely also program in it. Those of who that do not, or have not for many years like myself, find the sun.com web site to be the most unfriendly to visitors. What really troubles me is they have the technology to know who is visiting their web site. This information could easily narrow the number of different options based on the operating system the client is coming from.

The second thing Sun.com needs to do is remove needless clicks on their web site. I swear I clicked 2 dozen things to find what I was looking for. Perhaps they are too proud to write a web script in JavaScript or use Flash to ease the navigation process. What ever the deal is, they seriously need to address their navigation problems and fast.

They need a browser called ‘sun screen‘, that will filter the crap you have to go through when you visit sun.com!!!

Google Talk

I just installed the new Google Talk communication program. I am very excited to see how simplistic it is and the way it manages open windows is very revolutionary. You’re not going to find any faces when you type in 🙂 but that is what is neat, it kind of gives me a feel of the old school back when chatting on IRC you just had to know how the faces were typed.

What also excites me about Google is they use NSIS for their installers. There may be a slight chance they use Venis to edit their installs. I give it a likelyhood of %40, with another %40 chance they are editing them in SciTE. I have noticed that the other google products such as the Desktop, Gmail E-mail checker, Hello, and Picasa use NSIS. Very exciting to see technology I prefer being used at large companies! 🙂

mp3 player search

I am looking at picking up an mp3 player. I am leaning towards a Rio Carbon since it plays all formats and can be charged through a USB port. The Rio Karma is tempting since it has a lot more space for only a few more bucks and it has an ethernet port. The big advantage I see with the Carbon or an iPod Shuffle is with the storage. I presume the Shuffle and Carbon use ROM type media where the other iPods and the Karma use an actual physical disc drive. Anyone have an opinion here?